RETHINKING WILDLIFE CRIME COVERAGE

Amid shrinking newsroom resources in South Africa, effective and responsible environmental reporting is taking a backseat to sensationalist media trends. Poor quality coverage of wildlife crime is one of the results.

This is among opening remarks in a thought-provoking discussion taking place between seasoned journalists, wildlife crime researcher and law professor Dr Annette Hübschle, and emerging environmental writers registered on Roving Reporters New Narratives ’24 training programme.

Join the discussion below.

RETHINKING WILDLIFE CRIME COVERAGE

What do you think about the media’s frequent use of sensationalist, militaristic terms such as “the raging war on poaching”?

Yes, the realities on the ground are stark, brutal, and violent, but does such terminology help?

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Comments to: RETHINKING WILDLIFE CRIME COVERAGE
  • June 11, 2024

    This is a very subjective topic. As much as I don\’t like sensationalism in the media, unfortunately, there is often apathy when it comes to subjects like this. If humans don\’t feel the issue personally then it has little affect on them. So I understand why some journalists try hard to get attention.

    We all do it to some extent. We tell our own stories with a bit more hyperbole than is needed to make us sound more interesting. Human nature is in all of us. The need for significance.
    Being aware of it is a good starting point.

    We all need to remember that speaking truth and fair comments go a long way to retaining our personal credibility. Maybe the reference to \”war\” is a step too far.

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