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Environment Ocean Watch

Offshore exploits threaten marine life

While offshore exploits could create millions of jobs, tapping into the economic potential of the oceans could come at an incalculable cost to marine life.

Environment Ocean Watch

Observe, submerge conserve

This is the motto driving a newly established marine science mentoring programme which aims to address a critical shortage of skills in marine conservation science and management

Environment Ocean Watch

‘Rockstars’ of ocean science

The coelacanth, once thought to be extinct, has become the rock star of ocean science, says leading marine biodiversity expert, Dr Kerry Sink.

Environment Ocean Watch

Hands-on research experience for marine students

The Blue Fund’s Ocean Stewards initiative has provided a unique opportunity to 15 University of KwaZulu-Natal marine science students, write Romeo Ndlovu and Tholithemba Shange.

Environment Thin Green Line Training

Wake up wilderness call

Within the first few days of her Roving Reporters internship, NANA ZUKE found herself deep in the wilderness, peeing behind a thorn tree, unaware of hyenas lurking nearby.

Environment Thin Green Line

Coal mining plans threaten wilderness area

Plans for a new coal mine on border of the iMfolozi wildereness spark resistance, writes Nana Zuke.

Environment Thin Green Line

How lions fell through the legislative cracks

The media in South Africa has played a critical role in exposing how ineffective legislation has enabled lions to be bred for the bullet, writes Romeo Ndlovu.

Arts & Film Environment Thin Green Line

Bred for the bullet: the cat is out the bag

Going undercover to make a documentary has its risks, especially regarding litigation and personal safety. Sometimes it’s worth the risk, says executive producer of Blood Lions, Andrew Venter.

Environment Ocean Watch

Bobbing baby turtle has scientists perplexed

Ula, a sick baby turtle, is bobbing on top of the water of a display tank at Durban’s Ushaka Sea World like a cork – ‘positively buoyant’ they call it,

Environment Ocean Watch

Loggerheads navigate using GPS

For a long time it has been a mystery how loggerhead turtles navigate thousands of kilometres, returning from feeding grounds to nest on the very beaches where they hatched