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Environment Ocean Watch

Space age tech deployed in Agulhas Current

Seafarers in South African waters have been warned to avoid tampering with two strange alien-looking crafts – one of them floating on the surface; the other drifting at depths of up to 1000 metres. FRED KOCKOTT and DIONY LALIEU report.

Ocean Watch

Welcoming the whales

Several hundred people turned out for Durban’s first Welcoming the Whales Festival at the Bluff over the weekend. The two-day long festival marked the opening of the 4th annual World Whale Conference (WWC2017) taking place in Durban. “We have delegates from all over the world, including Iceland, Madagascar, Portugal, Belgium, UK and USA, sharing ideas about whale and dolphin conservation,” said conference organiser, Wendy van Gool of the World Cetacean Alliance (WCA). Pods Van Gool said the frequent sightings of

Education Ocean Watch

Vital role of whales

There is an integral link between whales and the air we breathe, say Chris Bryan and Maggillivray Freeman of  Sustainable Human.

Environment Ocean Watch

Offshore exploits threaten marine life

While offshore exploits could create millions of jobs, tapping into the economic potential of the oceans could come at an incalculable cost to marine life.

Environment Ocean Watch

Observe, submerge conserve

This is the motto driving a newly established marine science mentoring programme which aims to address a critical shortage of skills in marine conservation science and management

Environment Ocean Watch

‘Rockstars’ of ocean science

The coelacanth, once thought to be extinct, has become the rock star of ocean science, says leading marine biodiversity expert, Dr Kerry Sink.

Environment Ocean Watch

Hands-on research experience for marine students

The Blue Fund’s Ocean Stewards initiative has provided a unique opportunity to 15 University of KwaZulu-Natal marine science students, write Romeo Ndlovu and Tholithemba Shange.

Environment Ocean Watch

Bobbing baby turtle has scientists perplexed

Ula, a sick baby turtle, is bobbing on top of the water of a display tank at Durban’s Ushaka Sea World like a cork – ‘positively buoyant’ they call it, leaving veterinary scientists perplexed as to what has caused this. Nompilo Kunene reports First published in The Witness Ula, which means Jewel of the Sea, is suffering from excessive intestinal gas, and also has a high white blood cell count, indicative of serious illness. The seven month-old critically endangered leatherback

Environment Ocean Watch

Loggerheads navigate using GPS

For a long time it has been a mystery how loggerhead turtles navigate thousands of kilometres, returning from feeding grounds to nest on the very beaches where they hatched

Environment Ocean Watch

Loggerheads battle against all odds

Two tiny loggerhead hatchlings look set to become an educational centrepiece at uShaka Marine World after their rescue off Durban beaches recently. Sabelo Nsele and Nomfundo Xolo report First published in Daily News At first, Durban lifeguard Owen Hlongwa had no idea what the “limp lump of something” that had washed up on uShaka Beach was. Then he saw faint signs of life. It was a baby loggerhead turtle, matchbox size. “I put it in a bucket of seawater and it started reviving,” said